Annoyed Hawk Scowls in Photo After Loyal Dog Swats Him to Ground and Saves Chickens

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Birds are animals we often forget about. We seldom notice that they are always flying above us, perched in trees or on telephone lines.

But there are some birds that we always remember are there. How could we ever forget the sly and daring seagulls that hop around in our space at the beach, snagging our sandwiches?

In fact, seagulls are great examples of just how fierce birds can be. For example, a young lady at Clearwater Beach in Florida decided to be nice and feed some seagulls, but it turned into a mob of seagulls chasing her down as she fled the scene.

Woman on Beach Nearly Gets Attacked by Flock of Aggressive Seagulls

Clearly, birds can be vicious. Basically, they know what they want, which is one thing — food!

So when one Lawrence, Kansas, resident’s dog experienced the hungry nature of a young juvenile hawk, it really wasn’t a surprise.

Taylor and Kailey Petrehn were serenely eating dinner in their apartment on Sunday evening when suddenly they spotted an odd site outside their window.

A young hawk had been eyeing their 13 chickens all day, seemingly hoping for a nice meal that night.

When the hawk finally decided to swoop in to make its move, the couple’s dog, Cooper, was not having it.

Cooper apparently loves their 13 chickens as his own, because brave Cooper jumped up and batted the vicious hawk out of the air.

Cooper, a 110-pound Anatolian Shepherd-Great Pyrenees mix, “gets along with chickens really well,” according to his owners.

The dog did not injure the hawk, but rather he just cornered the hawk and kept him from doing any damage.

Dazed, the hawk was rather flustered and did not move when Taylor Petrehn reached down and took hold of the young bird.

“I went up and grabbed it right away,” he said. “It was scared and dazed. It was just a juvenile bird.”

But that’s not the funniest part. If you look closely at the hawk’s face, you can spot the absolute annoyance plastered in the hawk’s snaring eyes and concerned look, upset that he won’t receive his tasty meal anymore.

Petrehn decided to release the hawk into the neighbor’s yard so the hawk could fly away on his way.

If the hawk happens to return for their 13 chickens, the Petrehns are not worried.

“He’s a great dog,” Taylor said regarding their rescue dog, Cooper. “He’s a shepherding dog, so he gets along with chickens really well.”

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